A Psychodynamic View of Reactive Depression

  • 10th April 2018

In an attempt to spark interest in a type of therapeutic approach known as “psychodynamic,” here excerpts from an interview with Dr. James Hollis, a well-known Jungian analyst and the author of Finding Meaning in the Second Half of Life: How to Finally, Really, Grow Up.  (To view the entire…

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March Madness

  • 17th March 2018

March Madness. Basketball. Sweet Sixteen. Final Four. It’s that time of year when college basketball rules ESPN and prime time TV. Brackets are posted. Cinderella teams emerge. Highly ranked teams are upset. The frenzy of excitement spills over into the beginning of April, and a team of 19-23-year-old young men…

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PTSD: Symptoms and Journey to Healing

  • 7th February 2018

Trauma is a fact of life in our current society. As Bessel van der Kolk, one of the world’s foremost experts on trauma states in his book, The Body Keeps Score, “Veteran and families deal with the painful aftermath of combat; one in five Americans has been molested; one in…

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Should I Get A Mental Health Evaluation?

  • 26th January 2018

A few weeks ago a jubilant president Trump declared that his annual physical examination went exceptionally well; Rear admiral Dr. Ronny Jackson, the president’s physician further endorsed this comment. Of note was Dr. Jackson’s statement that the president requested a mental health evaluation, which yielded perfect results on the Montreal…

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Holiday Expectations

  • 20th December 2017

It’s the most wonderful time of the year…unless, that is, there is a house to clean, cookies to bake and shopping that includes just the right candle for a perfectly accented table setting. Meanwhile there are the outside decorations, outfits for the office party (one for each, of course) along…

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Board Certification: Does It Really Matter?

  • 6th November 2017

The idea of a neuropsychological evaluation may sound quite intimidating, as thoughts of electrodes and brain scans often arise; however, those are not part of a neuropsychological evaluation, although they may certainly be recommended. If recommended, EEGs, brain MRIs, or other medical procedures would be ordered and reviewed by a…

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Gratitude

  • 24th October 2017

At Thanksgiving many of us pause around the table to consider what we are thankful for. We reflect on what we have overcome, persevered through, what we have. We may smile, laugh or even shed a tear. Gratitude is a healthy habit to cultivate all year long. Gratitude causes use…

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Delighting In Our Children

  • 10th October 2017

Twenty years ago, I read in a parenting book that the single most important message to convey to a child is that of delight in him.  Thinking about that as a young mother excited and encouraged me to do what felt natural and fun with my kids. I have since…

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Men, Depression, and Toxic Masculinity

  • 3rd July 2017

“Man up” “Boys don’t cry” “Be a man” “Don’t be such a girl” “Grow up” “Don’t be such a baby” “Get over it” We have all heard these phrases before. Subtle (and not-so-subtle) expressions are often utilized to help create an ideal of masculinity that is characterized by confidence, strength,…

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The 5 Love Languages

  • 2nd June 2017

The 5 Love Languages by Dr. Gary Chapman is an excellent book to recommend to couples looking to improve their relationship. Dr. Chapman believes how people show love to one another can be divided into five different categories, at least one of which we use to express love and expect/hope…

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